Course Descriptions

Language Arts

Language Arts 6

This is an English course designed to instruct students in reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking skills. Emphasis is given to paragraph development, proper usage and language mechanics. Students read a variety of texts and respond through varied creative and structured projects. Students will explore a variety of topics and develop their writing through the different types of writing such as expository, argumentative, and narrative. Vocabulary development is stressed and students are introduced to the basics of oral communication.

Language Arts 7

This is an English course designed to instruct students in reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking skills. Emphasis is given to paragraph development, proper usage and language mechanics. Students read a variety of texts and respond through varied creative and structured projects. Students will explore a variety of topics and continue to develop their writing through the different types of writing such as expository, argumentative, and narrative. Vocabulary development is stressed and students are introduced to the basics of oral communication.

Language Arts 8

This course provides students with instruction and practice to help improve their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Students read literary selections from various genres and transition to the study of English literature classics. Writing focuses on effective paragraph development, use of transitions, and organization techniques in developing essays. Students are required to write in a variety of modes with a concentration on organization and technique, as well as varied vocabulary. Students also practice the fundamental mechanics and structures of standard written and oral English, in order to be able to apply the correct level to a particular situation. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations.

Language Arts 9

Language Arts 9 is a year-long course that reviews the basics of both oral communication and literature studies. The oral communication segment covers the communication process itself, basic uses of language, "silent language” and the fundamentals of impromptu, informative, demonstration and persuasive speaking. The literature segments, based on a review of the elements of the various genre, focus on the novel, novelette, drama and epic poetry. Topics included are the hero's journey, the family, the impact of change, maturation, prejudice/discrimination and cultural similarities/differences. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of basic skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking and thinking. Students are required to write in a variety of modes with a concentration on organization and technique. Students also practice the fundamental mechanics and structures of standard written and oral English, in order to be able to apply the correct level to a particular situation. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations. Students also practice logic and critical reasoning to reach levels of competency when distinguishing the purpose/main idea of a work, as well as the structure of the work, including analysis of character, setting, and intended audience. Students will be introduced to the rhetorical appeals, as well as debate vs. Socratic dialogue. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations.

Language Arts 10

Language Arts 10 is a year-long course that provides an intensive study in the acquisition of independent reading and writing strategies through world literature and informative media that the student can apply to other school subjects. Writing instruction will focus on the internalization of different writing processes, content, style, audience, and purpose. Through the reading of novels, plays, poems, non-fiction, and short stories, students will be exposed to a variety of instructional strategies offering many opportunities to build reasoning skills based on synthesized evidence. By the end of the year, each student will have created a collection of writing that consists of several types of essays. Students should be able to use the reading, writing, and research skills acquired in this class to help them find success in their other courses, subsequent Language Arts classes, and real world situations. Students in Language Arts 10 will be prepared for general English 11 courses with emphasis on critical reasoning and literary analysis. Students excelling in this course can earn a recommendation to take AP English the following year.

AP Language & Composition

"The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods." - College Board

At ISO, AP Language and Composition is a 1 or 2-year college preparatory writing course that supports students' development of critical reasoning. Students will have the opportunity to take the AP Language and Composition exam in an effort to earn college credit once they have demonstrated confidence and proficiency with the course materials.

Language Arts Literacy

The Language Arts Literacy course provides support to students who wish to improve their writing and language skills. In quarter one, the course focuses on reading skills through close reading and analysis of texts. The students then write about the text, learning to make a strong claim and to support that claim with details from the passage. In quarter two, the course focuses on usage and punctuation with an emphasis on sentence fluency. As well, the students build their vocabulary through weekly vocabulary exercises and quizzes.

World Literature

Students will engage in the reading of works from a variety of places and perspectives to understand how universal themes span culture and time periods. Through the use of a variety of mentor texts and supplemental works (novels, short stories, poems, articles, etc.), students will further develop their ability to interpret and analyze literary and informational selections.
Students continue to develop more precise writing skills and write literary analyses, arguments, and narrative pieces, focusing on the skills of topic development, organization, diction/syntax, and the use of textual evidence. Grammar is reviewed through writing to emphasize the finer points of mechanics and word choice, and vocabulary is drawn from both the readings and from other sources. Students will prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations to express their ideas and learn from/build on the ideas of others. They will formally and informally present their knowledge and ideas, utilizing various forms of digital media to enhance their message.

Mathematics

Math 6

This course forges a solid conceptual base by building on students’ prior knowledge. Students move their understanding from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract focusing on mathematical processes. Real world examples are used extensively giving students the understanding that math is more than computation. Topics covered include: Variable Expressions, Operations with Integers Statistics, Decimal Operations, Number Patterns Related to Fractions, Fraction Operations, Ratio, Proportion and Percent, and Geometry and Measurement.

Math 7

Grade 7 integrated mathematics builds upon the concepts learned in the Grade 6 integrated math class.This year is about (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.

Math 8

The focus of the course lies in skill development, application of skills, and preparation for high school. Three critical areas covered in Grade 8 are:

(1) Formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations;

(2) Grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships;

(3) Analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

Math 9

This course will extend upon student knowledge gained in the middle grades. Students will focus upon reading, writing and using technology to solve real world mathematical problems accurately. The six major areas of focus are: (1) continued understanding and manipulation of solving algebraic equations; (2) analyzing functions; (3) extend understanding of linear relationships to systems of equations; (4) find linear models and the line of best fit for linear data; (5) expand knowledge of triangle congruency as well as translations, reflections and rotations; (6) utilizing the Pythagorean Theorem in the coordinate plane to solve problems and verify geometric relationships.

Math 10

This course designed to ensure career and college readiness. The standards in the high school sequence specify the mathematics that all students should study in order to be college and career ready. In addition to traditional math skills practice, this class includes online tasks. Some tasks will be done in groups and the grade will be comprised of both a group grade and an individual grade. Some tasks will be done individually and will count as a test grade. Topics from Algebra 1, Algebra 2, trigonometry, complex numbers, Statistics and Data Analysis are included.

Adv. Math/Statistics

Advanced Math + Statistics explores the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research.

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus

This course develops the concepts of limits and continuity in order to build the foundation for Calculus. The derivative is then introduced, and students investigate many of its applications. Secondly, the integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus are studied, as well as many of their applications, including differential equations. Emphasis is on real world applications and modeling real world situations. Students are expected to take the AP Exam. A graphing calculator is required.

Pre-Calculus

In Pre-Calculus, juniors and seniors are exposed to a variety of interesting math topics. Students will use math tools they have previously developed to learn entirely new mathematical skills. These topics include: trigonometry, vectors and parametric equations, polar coordinates and complex numbers, conic sections and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, combinatorics and probability, and statistics and data analysis.

Science

Science 6

The Grade 6 Integrated Science course at ISO covers content from the Next Generation Science Standards. Students learn through inquiry, hands-on activities while utilizing the Scientific Method. This year focuses on life's structure and function, how organisms grow and reproduce, how energy flows through systems and global temperature patterns and trends.

Science 7

The Grade 7 Integrated Science course at ISO covers content from the Next Generation Science Standards. It builds upon the concepts learned in the previous year. Students learn through inquiry, hands-on activities while utilizing the Scientific Method. This year focuses on properties of matter, ecosystem interactions and how Earth has changed over time.

Science 8

This course is the third of a three year integrated science program. Recurring themes are used to show the connections between the sciences. The scientific method is stressed and used in developing the following concepts: motion and forces, energy in waves, mechanisms of diversity and Earth's changing processes. Students will also develop scientific skills of researching, hypothesizing, modeling, graphing, experimenting, analyzing, and presenting conclusions, as they complete hands-on activities.

Biology 9

In this introductory course grade 9/10 students will focus on the biological principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Topics include biochemistry, ecology, cells, genetics, evolution, and the diversity of organisms. An emphasis is placed on using scientific skills of analysis, research, modelling, experimenting, and writing while learning biological terms and developing understanding.

Chemistry

Chemistry is a rigorous one-year introductory course that studies matter and the changes of matter. Its curriculum is designed to prepare students for a second year of Chemistry (AP level). This comprehensive course places emphasis on chemical theory, practical applications, and problem solving. Chemistry concepts and scientific processing skills are developed through the study of matter, energy, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions. Chemistry theories will be introduced through explanation, discussion, and discovery labs. There is the usual laboratory work present in any chemistry class. Chemistry students will learn about safety, common lab equipment, acquire laboratory skills, and study different chemical reactions.

Advanced Placement (AP) Biology

AP Biology is divided into 8 units: Intro to Biology, Biochemistry and Energy, Cellular Processes,

Cell Cycle and Communication, Genetics and Gene Activity, Evolution, Plant Diversity and Ecology, and Biological Systems. Students should be aware of the demanding nature of this course in terms of the level of the material, the amount of preparation time required out of the classroom, and the difficulty of unit summative tasks. This course also includes a strong laboratory component. Students need to have successfully completed Biology and Chemistry to take AP Biology.

Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry

AP Chemistry begins with a brief review of first year Chemistry and then moves along at a fast pace through units on Reactions in Aqueous Solution, Thermochemistry, Electronic Structure of Atoms, Periodicity, Bonding, Molecular Geometry and VSEPR, Gas Laws, Chemical Kinetics, Acid/Base Chemistry, and Equilibrium. Each unit includes a strong lab-based component, to accumulate to 16 total labs on the year. Students need to have successfully completed Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra II to take AP Chemistry.

Environmental Science

The goal of the Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.

Physics 11-12

Students in this course will focus on the basic concepts in physics: dynamics, kinematics, work and energy, kinetic theory, waves, sound, light, electricity, and atomic energy. Emphasis will be placed on developing concepts before calculations, practical applications, and improving laboratory skills.

Social Studies

Social Studies 6

This course undertakes the study of geography, history, and cultures of the Eastern Hemisphere. Topics include pre-history of Early Humans and the River Valley Civilizations, comparative world religions, classical civilizations, and interactions across the Eastern Hemisphere. Writing, communication, and research skills from Language Arts, will be integrated with an emphasis given to note-taking strategies. An interactive notebook will be utilized alongside a combination of lecture, group activities, student-centered instruction, and research projects for a comprehensive approach to learning.

Social Studies 7

This course undertakes a broad study of world history, covering theories of the first people to arrive to the Americas and a study of Native American tribes and culture. The time period of Medieval and Renaissance Europe is covered as a Segue into causes of European exploration and its effect on the rest of the world. Students will not only study historical facts, but learn to develop critical thinking about topics and historical societies around the world. Writing, communication, and research skills from Language Arts, will be integrated with an emphasis on note-taking strategies. An interactive notebook will be utilized alongside a combination of lecture, group activities, student-centered instruction, and research projects for a comprehensive approach to learning.

Social Studies 8

By focusing on key historical events just prior to and during the nineteenth century (French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Colonialism in Africa and the Meiji Restoration in Japan) the students learn how events in history have shaped the world we live in today. The final unit - a history of human rights - puts together what the students learned about extending rights to all social classes, to laborers and children, and to people of color. The students analyze primary and secondary sources, including images, to learn about multiple interpretations of a single historical event and about bias.

Social Studies 9 - Ancient Civilizations

Ancient Civilizations is a multi-faceted course which looks at a range of societal themes to enable students to build an understanding of the early stages of humans living in complex agro-urban communities. Students have study early legal systems and the role of women in Mesopotamia. They then complete an in-depth study of the Roman Empire to determine if it fell or slowly changed. Further themes to be explored this year are China, the Silk Road, Suleiman, and the Aztecs, ending with a study of the role of the printing press in society.

This study is assessed by a number of different unit methods such as presentations, discussions, and essays.

Social Studies 10 - African Studies

African Studies is a multi-faceted course which looks at a range of African themes to enable students to build an understanding of the second biggest geographic continent and the second most populous continent on earth. Students will investigate the key themes of the physical geography of Africa, such as the Koppen climate zones, diversity, history, economics, political systems, religion, art and international connections.

This course is assessed by a number of different unit assessment methods such as presentations, discussions, and essays and a major research piece.

AP Human Geography 11-12

The AP Human geography course is a rigorous course of university-level material that explores the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth's surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. This course studies: basic geographic concepts, population, health and migration, folk and popular culture, languages, religions, ethnicities, political geography, development, food and agriculture, industry and manufacturing, services and settlements and urban patterns.

This course is assessed by unit by unit tests, a mid-year mock examination plus the end of year externally set and assessed AP Human Geography examination.

Historical Studies 11-12

Medieval and Renaissance Studies is a multi-faceted course which looks at a range of societal themes to enable students to build an understanding of these two most important eras, both of which had significant implications for Africa. Students will investigate the key themes of the Saharan, Arabian and European slave trades, the Black Death in Europe and how it initiated the age of discovery and European expansion, the printing press and its contribution to the ongoing change in European society, including the Renaissance and the Reformation.

This course is assessed by a number of different unit methods such as presentations, discussions and essays.

Non-Francophone (NF) French

French NF Beginner 6 - 8

This course is designed to help middle school students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the French language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where French is spoken.

French NF Intermediate 6 - 8

It is intended to build on the skills acquired previously including the sound-symbol system, vocabulary as well as word and sentence order appropriate to simple oral or written texts in the present, future and past tenses.

Students will be working towards understanding the meaning of a series of interrelated ideas in oral or written texts dealing with a familiar topic, primarily in structured situations and to some extent in unstructured situations and to express their communicative intent by producing, orally and in writing, a series of interrelated ideas, mostly prepared in advance but working towards being more spontaneously, based on the communicative task.

French NF Advanced 6 - 8

This course continues to develop the language skills in French through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities relate to the topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall, and creativity. Middle school students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the French language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the French speaking world.

French NF Beginner 9-12

This course is designed to help high school students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the French language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where French is spoken.

French NF Intermediate 9-12

It is intended to build on the skills acquired previously including the sound-symbol system, vocabulary as well as word and sentence order appropriate to simple oral or written texts in the present, future and past tenses.

Students will be working towards understanding the meaning of a series of interrelated ideas in oral or written texts dealing with a familiar topic, primarily in structured situations and to some extent in unstructured situations and to express their communicative intent by producing, orally and in writing, a series of interrelated ideas, mostly prepared in advance but working towards being more spontaneously, based on the communicative task.

French NF Advanced 9-12

This course continues to develop the language skills in French through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities relate to the topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall, and creativity. High school students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the French language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the French speaking world.

Advanced Placement (AP) French Language

This course focuses on the mastery of communicative skills. Vocabulary is expanded to enable the student to read newspaper and magazine articles, literary texts, and other non-technical writings without dependency on a dictionary. The stress will also be on developing the student’s ability to express himself/herself in French, both orally and in writing, with reasonable fluency and accuracy. Grade 11/12 students are encouraged to take the AP Exam in the spring, which may result in college credit for successful participants.

Francophone French

Francophone 6-8

This course aims to encourage students to understand and appreciate language, to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with diverse audiences and in a range of situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning while developing an appreciation for literature.

The students will be prepared to tackle argumentation by undertaking a detailed study of narrative and explanatory texts. They will learn how to organize their ideas, produce coherent and structured texts, apply critical-thinking to identify and solve problems in a globalized context. They will also study texts or books from African, French or European writers to develop and expand their cultural awareness.

Francophone 9-12

This Francophone program aims to deepen the knowledge and mastering of the French language particularly in the lexical and syntax areas in order to express thoughts and opinions in a clear, rigorous and convincing manner in an environment nurturing curiosity, exchange of ideas, open-mindedness and creativity.

Therefore, this course is organized according to 3 essential orientations: comprehension and practice of the main forms of argumentation (associated with the narrative, descriptive and explanatory styles); self-expression (acquired through narrative writing or argumentation with an emphasis on involvement); consideration of others (envisaged first in its individual dimension and then in the social and cultural dimension through the study of literature, especially African and European).

Physical Education

The co-educational physical education program is designed to offer each student experiences in a variety of activities: team sports, physical fitness activities, swimming and recreational activities. Through these activities students are encouraged and assisted in learning to move more effectively and to develop skills that will lead to participation in leisure time sports activities. Physical Education is a full year mandatory course at the grade 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 levels. Students in grades 11 and 12 have the option to enroll in a fitness course.

Health

This course focuses on overall health- social, mental, and physical health. It is offered as a quarter class for grades 6, 7, 8 and 9. It is designed to enhance the awareness and knowledge of healthy lifestyle choices. We cover six units including Health Promotion, Fitness Basics, Nutrition, Weight Management, Stress Management and Sexuality while enabling students to make healthy choices for their overall health. Students learn the various facets of health and wellness, the components of fitness, the importance of knowing their heart rate and BMI, the digestive tract, signs of stress, ways to manage stress, and the human reproductive system.

Junior Research Seminar

This year-long course teaches students how to conduct a research project. Throughout the year, they will learn how to choose a topic, develop a research question, formulate a thesis, find sources, build a bibliography, design an outline, analyze information, develop and defend arguments, write a paper, and present their results for a panel and an audience. The course focuses on practice; the students will visit the library on a weekly basis and will do a variety of exercises to master each component. In addition to the instructor, an advisor will guide them during their research process.

Senior Seminar – Grade 12 1st semester

Senior Seminar is a comprehensive and mandatory course for all 12th grade students at ISO. The course focus is on career options and the move to post-secondary education. Students will explore and thoroughly plan and prepare for life after high school. Planning and applying to colleges and post-secondary schools will be the primary goal of the course. Students will participate in every phase of college preparation and planning—researching and matching with colleges, writing personal statements, submitting applications and financial aid forms, applying for scholarships and exploring careers and other post-secondary options. Students will complete a CV and letter of introduction for future job applications. Guest speakers present alternative views on future education or career options.

Assessment for this course is based on in-class contributions and research into international and American university options and scholarships. In addition, it is based upon timely submission of all deliverable items specified in the course guide.

Economics Grade 12 2nd semester

Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. This course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets. The course aims to enable students to: develop an understanding of microeconomic theories and concepts; develop an appreciation of the impact on individuals and societies of economic interactions; develop an awareness of development issues that relate to micro economic decisions.

This course is assessed by a number of different unit assessment methods such as presentations, discussions, and essays and a major research piece.

AP Studio Art (2-D or Drawing)

AP Studio Art students work with diverse media, styles, subjects, and content. Students create a three-part portfolio that is submitted to the College Board for evaluation. The Breadth section illustrates a range of ideas and approaches to art making. The Concentration section demonstrates sustained, deep, and multi-perspective investigation of a student-selected topic. The Quality section represents the student’s most successful works with respect to form and content. Student work is informed and guided by observation, research, experimentation, discussion, critical analysis, and reflection. Students document their artistic ideas and practices to demonstrate conceptual and technical development over time. This course does not have a written test.

Quarter Courses 6-9

The purpose of the mandatory exploratory offerings is to provide students an opportunity to experience several complementary courses of studies in preparation for selecting those of higher aptitude and interest in high school.

Information Technology 6

This course opens the first window to the coding world. The students participate in the "Hour Of Code" activity in the Code.org website. They then learn "Stick Figure Animation" using another software - Pivot Animator. Finally, they strengthen their programming logic using the "Scratch" platform.

Information Technology 7

Middle school IT is a cross-curricular course that is intended to deepen students’ knowledge, skills and application of current computer programs, topics and technologies while allowing the students to integrate and apply this knowledge into their core classroom activities. Through all grades, the course will reinforce areas such as internet safety, keyboarding, effective research, writing and preparing research papers and projects, online documents and applications and Microsoft Office and Office type applications.

In 7thgrade, the students will build upon the 6thgrade content and then delve into more online content. Students will also begin to learn the basics of video, photo and music recording technology.

Information Technology 8

Middle school IT is a cross-curricular course that is intended to deepen students’ knowledge, skills and application of current computer programs, topics and technologies while allowing the students to integrate and apply this knowledge into their core classroom activities. Through all grades the course will reinforce areas such as internet safety, keyboarding, effective research, writing and preparing research papers and projects, online documents and applications and Microsoft Office and Office type applications.

The 8thgrade curriculum will be completely projects based, building upon their prior knowledge by creating detailed websites, videos and projects. The students will be encouraged and expected to utilize and apply these computer skills effectively for their core classes.

Performing Arts 6

This is the first of a series of yearly quarter courses. It designed as an introduction to the performing arts. The students will learn various skills to help them perform for an audience. They will explore concepts such as magic, balafon, improvisation, and basic acting skills. Their performance will include the creation of a magic show for an elementary audience.

Performing Arts 7

This quarter course builds on principles learned in Performing Arts 6. It focuses on voice and movement. The students will work on forms like pantomime, shadow puppetry and/or dancing. Every year, a project is done with the Middle School Art class and performed for an audience.

Performing Arts 8

This course focuses on acting. The students will either devise a play in collaboration with the language arts class or learn an existing play. They will learn how to stage, block, act within an ensemble as well as give input for technical aspects (light and sound) before performing for an audience.

Performing Arts 9

This last installment of quarter classes explores musical theatre. Students will either perform excerpts of known musicals or create one. They will learn basic music strategies for performance, practice dance routines to create their own choreographies, and work on acting skills focusing on expression, gesture and movement. They will perform their creation for an audience. The course will also include exercises in improvisation.

Research and Information Management 6-9

This one quarter class for grades six through nine is designed to enhance students’ ability to carry out a research project successfully. From planning strategies to guide inquiry, to managing, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information, students develop skills that enable lifelong learning as well as career readiness. The skills developed, tasks selected and product expectations all vary depending on the developmental level of the students. All of the classes, however, provide instruction on development of a research question to drive research, effective note-taking and summarizing skills, and evaluation of websites for reliability, authority and relevance, appropriate citation of sources and production of a final product to showcase their research. Some time is given, as well, to improving their typing skills and to learn about internet safety.

Middle School Electives

Middle School Band

During this course, students will be actively engaged in performing, and creating music. The course is focused on learning to play an instrument (woodwind or brass) within an ensemble and performing for an audience, but students will also develop a broader perspective by working with specific musical software such as GarageBand, Note flight and Audacity. When possible, students will be working with local musicians.

Environmental Issues

This middle school elective invites the students to explore a variety of environmental issues including climate change, deforestation, and ozone depletion in order to understand the impact humans have had on their physical environment as well as the ways technology affects the environment both positively and negatively. The final unit examines historical examples of people coming together to improve environmental conditions either locally, nationally or globally. The students learn through research, guest lectures and field trips in order to see the real world relevance of the class.

High School Electives

HS Information Technology

The High School Information Technology course is divided in two parts. The first part introduces the students to programming. They first build their programming logic using flowcharts and pseudocode. Then they start writing real codes using the computer language - Java. They use NetBeans as the Integrated Development Environment (IDE). The course is mapped with an online learning tool - CodeAcademy.com.

The second part opens the vast and very interesting world of 3D Modeling and Simulations to the students. They use and open source app called Blender to create their own 3D models and simulations. They follow a lot of online tutorials offered by Blender.org.

High School Performing Arts

This Semester 1 course focuses on performing for an audience. Students will learn various skills to improve their stage presence, vocal projection and acting skills. They will study forms and genres such as Commedia dell’Arte, monologue and storytelling. They will perform a one-act play for an audience and work with guest artists from the community.

High School Band

During this course, students will be actively engaged in performing, and creating music mainly from jazz repertoire. The course is focused on learning to play an instrument (woodwind, brass, bass guitar or drums) within an ensemble and performing for an audience, but students will also develop a broader perspective by learning to compose music with specific software such as GarageBand, Note flight and Audacity. When possible, students will be working with local musicians.

High School Drama

This Semester 1 course builds and expands on principles learned in High School Performing Arts. The students will continue exploring the craft of acting in an approach that involves exercises, scene work and theater games designed to develop performance skills and technique. The will learn to develop creativity and self-expression through improvisation. They will also explore the function of the director, stage manager and playwright in the creative process. During the semester, they will perform a one-act play for an audience.

High School Art Electives

High School Art Electives are rotated each year to offer students a variety of choices and to cater to student interests. Electives include Foundational, Digital Art, and Special Topics courses. Foundation courses include Drawing, 2-D Design, 3-D Design. These courses focus on developing studio habits and building technical skills in relevant media. Digital Art courses may focus on photography, graphic design, or video using tools like Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and iMovie.

Special Topics have included Textile and Fashion Design, Interior Design and Architecture, and Product Design. All courses include study of artists throughout history with a focus on contemporary and global artists.

Technical Writing

In Technical Writing we will explore various aspects of digital composition, publication and design, as well as learn how to market our work. We will use the school newspaper, yearbook, and student Facebook page as the primary mediums for our learning, as well as blogging, developing a professional web presence, and learning to write to an audience of professional organizations like universities or businesses. This course will emphasize team-based, journalistic writing reflecting the kinds of jobs writers do in the digital age.

Guitar

High school students will develop the skills necessary to play common chords, simple melodies and bass lines on the guitar in a setting which allows personal expression and growth. Once students have attained a novice level in their playing of the guitar they will have the freedom to explore their musical interests on a much more individual basis allowing them to pursue rock, jazz, blues or any other style of music they desire.

This semester course will include both solo and ensemble performances and have a focus on original composition.

Special Academic Programs

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 6-8 Beginner

This course is for students who come to ISO with little or no knowledge of basic English. Students first learn to express their basic school needs in English. From that point on, the main goal of ESOL is to improve language proficiency in academic situations, or those aspects of language proficiency that emerge and become distinctive with formal schooling. Students use the English language to reason and analyze, to comprehend oral and written text and to learn new vocabulary and concepts. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes. For those students with minimal knowledge of English there is a partial-immersion class; this is designed to provide students with the skills to access the regular curriculum.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 6-8 Intermediate

This course is for students whose native language is other than English, who have already acquired basic English skills but still need to improve their proficiency in English. This course is expanding the topics of the beginner ESOL course on a higher level and will help students to improve their listening, speaking, pronunciation and writing skills and to learn correct English grammar. It will also help students to improve their vocabulary knowledge and literacy skills. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes.

The English language level of every non-native speaker will be evaluated by a norm-referenced test at the end of each semester. The result of this test will determine if the student needs to continue the ESOL class or not.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 9-10 Intermediate

This course is for students whose native language is other than English, who have already acquired Basic English skills but still need to improve their proficiency in English. This course is expanding the topics of the beginner ESOL course on a higher level and will help students to improve their listening, speaking, pronunciation and writing skills and to learn correct English grammar. It will also help students to improve their vocabulary knowledge and literacy skills. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes.

The English language level of every non-native speaker will be evaluated by a norm-referenced test at the end of each semester. The result of this test will determine if the student needs to continue the ESOL class or not.

01 BP 1142, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Tel: 226-25-36-21-43
Tel: 226-25-36-13-50

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