Course Descriptions

Language Arts

101 Language Arts 6

This is an English course designed to instruct students in reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking skills. Emphasis is given to paragraph development, proper usage and language mechanics. Students read a variety of literature and respond through varied creative and structured projects. Students begin research skills, produce a research paper, and give several oral presentations. Vocabulary development is stressed and students are introduced to the basics of oral communication.

102 Language Arts 7

This is an English course designed to instruct students in reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking skills. Emphasis is given to paragraph development, proper usage and language mechanics. Students read a variety of literature and respond through varied creative and structured projects. Students continue developing research skills and produce a research paper. Vocabulary development is stressed and students are introduced to the basics of oral communication.

103 Language Arts 8

This course provides students with instruction and practice to help improve their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Students read literary selections from various genres and transition to the study of English literature classics. Writing focuses on effective paragraph development use of transitions and organization techniques in developing essays. Students are required to write in a variety of modes with a concentration on organization and technique, as well as varied vocabulary. Students also practice the fundamental mechanics and structures of standard written and oral English, in order to be able to apply the correct level to a particular situation. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations.

The following individual units are part of the Language Arts 8 curriculum: Daily Oral Language, book production by the class of personal writing, bi-weekly compositions, The Pearl (Steinbeck), Farewell to Manzanar (Houston/Houston), Heroes, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths (Evslin), The Miracle Worker (Gibson), One Thousand Paper Cranes (Ishii), Red Scarf Girl (Jiang), and The House on Mango Street (Cisneros).

The culminating project of the year will be the publication of a class book to present selected original pieces of writing of each of the class members. All facets of the book, from the title to the illustrations to the interviews with authors, will be student-produced. This limited edition publication will then be housed in the homes of the students, the school library and the admin office.

104 English 9 (1.0)

This course reviews the basics of both oral communication and literature studies. The oral communication segment covers the communication process itself, basic uses of language, “silent language” and the fundamentals of impromptu, informative, demonstration and persuasive speaking. The literature segments, based on a review of the elements of the various genre, focus on the novel, novelette, drama and epic poetry. Topics included are the hero’s journey, the family, the impact of change, maturation, prejudice/discrimination and cultural similarities/differences. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of basic skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking and thinking. Students are required to write in a variety of modes with a concentration on organization and technique. Students also practice the fundamental mechanics and structures of standard written and oral English, in order to be able to apply the correct level to a particular situation. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations.

The following individual units are part of the English 9 curriculum: Daily Oral Language, big brother/sister exchange with pre-k, Oral Communication, World Mythology (Rosenberg), To Kill A Mockingbird (Lee), The Odyssey (Homer), Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare), and Nectar in a Sieve (Markandaya).

105 English 10 (1.0)

This course is arranged as a study of selected world literature designed to complement the study of World History. Students examine and respond to literature from a variety of cultural and historical settings. Emphasis is given to understanding the present from the past and to examining personal responsibility to the world community. Well-structured essays, critical discussion, in-depth study of literary classics and creative role-playing opportunities allow students to explore issues related to history, culture and society.

The following individual units are part of the English 10 curriculum. The pace and individual background of the class will determine the exact titles and quantity of classics covered during the year: Daily Oral Language, research paper: a short report, African Genesis: Folk Tales and Myths of Africa (Frobenius/Fox), Death and the King’s Horseman (Soyinka), Things Fall Apart (Achebe), Lord of the Flies (Golding), Night (Wiesel), Antigone (Sophocles), All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque), On the Beach (Shute), Hiroshima (Hersey), An Enemy of the People (Ibsen), and Siddhartha (Hesse).

106 Twentieth-Century Literature (1.0)

This course is a thematic study of world literature covering such topics are: fate vs. free will, man vs. society, know thyself, imprisoned lives and the impact of roots. Genres covered include the novel and drama from a variety of cultures. Grade 11/12 students are required to write in a variety of modes with a concentration on organization and technique. Students also practice the fundamental mechanics and structures of standard written and oral English in order to be able to apply the correct level to a particular situation. Other activities include research, group projects, discussion and oral presentations. Potential texts for the course include: Snow Falling on Cedars, On the Beach, Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm, Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Crucible, Great Gatsby, Red Scarf Girl, Inherit the Wind, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Hiroshima.

107 Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature (1.0)

Grade 11/12. This course is a thematic study of contemporary world literature and is designed to complement the study of current social issues. The study of universal themes and the relationship of society to literature constitute the core of the class. Students experience opportunities to analyze and interpret novels, drama, poetry, short stories, and non-fiction through a variety of analytical, narrative, and persuasive writings. Completion of a ‘senior project’ is also an essential expectation of the course.

108 Advanced Placement (AP) English Language and Composition (1.0)

Grade 11/12 students in this college-level course will have previously demonstrated strong writing and analytical skills. Students read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of prose selections and develop their awareness of how language works. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their own composing abilities. The primary goal is to move students toward thinking about what they are reading in a more reflective, disciplined, logical and alert way. The class considers many prose texts from a variety of time periods and cultures, speculating about the writers’ use of language and other choices authors’ made/make in their writing. The main focus is to facilitate the scrutiny of linguistic and rhetorical choices, rather than to study the subtleties of literary analysis. Language study is at the center of the course and is, therefore, the focus of papers written in response to literary selections read.

Mathematics

201 Math 6

This course forges a solid conceptual base by building on students’ prior knowledge. Students move their understanding from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract focusing on mathematical processes. Real world examples are used extensively giving students the understanding that math is more than computation.

Topics covered include: Operations, Estimation and Variable Expressions, Measurement and Statistics, Basic Decimal Operations, Number Patterns Related to Fractions, Basic Fraction Operations, Ratio, Proportion and Percent, and Geometry and Measurement.

202 Pre-Algebra

This course is an introduction to algebra; therefore, students will be exposed to the foundations of algebra. Topics include: solving expressions with variables, integers, rational numbers, exponents, square roots, solving equations and inequalities, writing and solving ratios, proportions, percentages, graphing linear functions, analyzing and graphing data, and statistics. An emphasis will be placed on learning algebraic terms and developing problem solving skills in application problems and activities.

203 Algebra I (1.0)

This course develops an understanding of the major content areas of algebra. Concise explanations precede short clear question sets (each proceeding from easy to difficult) so that problem-solving abilities are developed. A large proportion of these questions are written to demonstrate to the student that algebra is applicable to many real-life situations. Note-taking strategies are built upon throughout the text.

204 Geometry (1.0)

Students learn to recognize and work with geometric concepts in various contexts. They build on ideas of inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, concepts, and techniques of Euclidean plane and solid geometry and develop an understanding of mathematical structure, method, and applications of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling to solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles; triangles; right triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; geometric constructions; symmetry; the use of transformations; and non-Euclidean geometries.

205 Algebra II (1.0)

Algebra 2 is an extension of Algebra. In the first half of the course the students will look closely at relations, functions and graphs. They will revisit linear relations and functions, identify systems of linear equations and inequalities, look at the nature of graphs, and explore polynomials and rational functions. The second half of the course is trigonometry. The students will be re-exposed to trigonometric functions, and will identify graphs of the trigonometric functions. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator; it will be used extensively in this course.

206 Pre-Calculus (1.0)

In Pre-Calculus, juniors and seniors are exposed to a variety of interesting math topics. Students will use math tools they have previously developed to learn entirely new mathematical skills. These topics include: trigonometry, vectors and parametric equations, polar coordinates and complex numbers, conic sections and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, combinatorics and probability, and statistics and data analysis. The course ends with an introduction to calculus concepts to stimulate students' interest in the calculus. A graphing calculator is required.

207 Advanced Math/Statistics (1.0)

Advanced Math is a semester course. The major focus of this class is to learn and apply strategies to solve problems. Initially students will use organization problem-solving skills. Then they will develop logical reasoning skills. Practice and application will involve strategies such as elimination techniques, creating matrices, looking for patterns, guessing and checking

Statistics is also a semester course. Statistics is the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research.

208 Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus (1.0)

This course prepares seniors for higher-level university mathematics and the AP exam. The course is divided into three distinct parts. It begins with an overview of functions and then develops the concepts of limits and continuity in order to build the foundation for Calculus. The derivative is then introduced, and students investigate many of its applications. Thirdly, the integral and the fundamental theorem of Calculus are studied, as well as many of their applications, including differential equations. Emphasis is on real world applications and modeling real world situations. A graphing calculator is required.

Science

301 Science 6

This course is an integrated science program. It is a skill, theme and concept based course that prepares students for the higher-level sciences. The scientific method is stressed and is used as a backbone for the teaching of the following concepts: interactions of living things, diversity of living things, solutions, force and motion, structures and design, geology, and plants. The scientific skills of analyzing, researching, hypothesizing, modeling, graphing, experimenting, and reporting, as well as, laboratory skills and usage of lab equipment are developed using a hands on/real life laboratory approach. Reoccurring themes are used to show the connections between the sciences.

302 Science 7

This course is an integrated science program. It is a skill, theme and concept based course that prepares students for the higher-level sciences. The scientific method is stressed and is used as a backbone for the teaching of the following concepts: interactions of living things, diversity of living things, solutions, force and motion, structures and design, geology, and plants. The scientific skills of analyzing, researching, hypothesizing, modeling, graphing, experimenting, and reporting, as well as, laboratory skills and usage of lab equipment are developed using a hands on/real life laboratory approach. Reoccurring themes are used to show the connections between the sciences.

303 Science 8

This course is the third of a three year integrated science program. Recurring themes are used to show the connections between the sciences. The scientific method is stressed and used in developing the following concepts: life processes, chemical bonding and reactions, Earth’s changing processes, geological history, motion, and electricity. Students will also develop scientific skills of researching, hypothesizing, modeling, graphing, experimenting, analyzing, and presenting conclusions, as they complete hands-on activities.

304 Biology (1.0)

In this introductory course grade 9/10 students will focus on the biological principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Topics include biochemistry, ecology, cells, genetics, evolution, and the diversity of organisms. An emphasis is placed on using scientific skills of analysis, research, modelling, experimenting, and writing while learning biological terms and developing understanding.

305 Chemistry (1.0)

Chemistry is a rigorous one-year introductory course that studies matter and the changes of matter. Its curriculum is designed to prepare students for a second year of Chemistry (AP level). This comprehensive course places emphasis on chemical theory, practical applications, and problem solving. Chemistry concepts and scientific processing skills are developed through the study of matter, energy, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions. Chemistry theories will be introduced through explanation, discussion, and discovery labs. There is the usual laboratory work present in any chemistry class. Chemistry students will learn about safety, common lab equipment, acquire laboratory skills, and study different chemical reactions.

Special Requirement: Scientific Calculator such as the TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator (Preferably Silver Edition) required in other courses.

306 Physics (1.0)

Students in this course will focus on the basic concepts in physics: dynamics, kinematics, work and energy, kinetic theory, waves, sound, light, electricity, and atomic energy. Emphasis will be placed on developing concepts before calculations, practical applications, and improving laboratory skills.

307 Earth & Space Science (1.0)

This course provides a study of the Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and the universe around it. An emphasis will be on the processes that shape the constantly changing Earth and how these transformations impact our daily lives. Students will use scientific thinking and reasoning in laboratory activities, computer activities, fieldwork, and public presentation (Earth Day Symposium). A historical perspective will give students an understanding on how scientific knowledge is gathered and shaped by the tools of technology.

308 Advanced Placement (AP) Biology (1.0)

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. AP Biology includes those topics regularly covered and the textbooks used in a college biology course. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by grade 11/12 students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing sciences of biology.

309 Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry (1.0)

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a course and examination offered by the College Board as a part of the Advanced Placement Program to give high school students the opportunity to demonstrate their abilities and earn college-level credit. Alternatively, it can be used to prepare high school students for college level Chemistry classes. AP Chemistry is a course geared toward highly motivated students with interests in chemical and physical sciences as well as any of the biological sciences. It is critical that laboratory work be an important part of an AP Chemistry course and 22 laboratory experiments are crucial to the curriculum. The course and exam cover common chemistry topics, including:

1. Reactions 2. States of Matter 3. Structure of Matter
1.1 Chemical equilibrium 2.1 Gases 3.1 Atomic theory
1.2 Chemical kinetics 2.2 Liquids 3.2 Chemical bonding
1.3 stoichiometry 2.3 Solids 3.3 Nuclear chemistry
1.4 Thermodynamics 2.4 Solutions

Social Studies

401 Social Studies 6

This course undertakes the study of geography, history, and cultures of Africa, Asia and Russia. Topics include pre-history through independence from colonial powers in Africa, population issues worldwide, the separation of North and South Korea and finally the history of Russia through the break-up of the Soviet Union. Using the writing, communication and research skills from Language Arts, students focus their research on a topic from Social Studies. Emphasis is given to note-taking strategies.

Prentice Hall: World Explorers Series

402 Social Studies 7

This course undertakes the study of geography, history, and culture of the world from the times of the Byzantium and Muslim Empires to the late 20th century. Topics include a brief overview of the foundations of civilizations from Egypt to China and continue with an in-depth study of Medieval Europe. Europe in transition is also examined from the Renaissance to worldwide conflicts of the Modern Era including: emphasis on the Age of Exploration, the Age of Revolution, the growth of nationalism, and the World Wars. Finally, a study of Europe and Russia by regions concludes this examination of World Cultures.

Prentice Hall: World Explorers Series

403 World History 8

From the mid sixteenth century to the end of the Cold War, this historical survey course integrates current events with a cause and effect approach from the past. In this course, grade eight students examine the significances of Western exploration, political and industrial revolutions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, colonialism, world wars I and II, and the end of the twentieth century. Historical perspectives, interactions, power, changes and historical links are all emphasized and analysed through a variety of research techniques including the use of maps, graphs, charts, diagrams and primary sources.

404 World Geography (1.0)

Freshmen students will focus on the study of the world’s people, places and environments. The knowledge, skills and perspectives promoted in the course are centred on the world’s population and cultural characteristics, its countries and current issues, its topography and political systems, as well as its dominant migration and settlement patterns. Special concepts of geography will be linked to chronological concepts of history to set a framework for studying human interactions. The course will emphasize how people in various cultures influence and are influenced by the many aspects of their environment.

405 African Studies (0.5)

During the first semester, sophomore students will explore the history of Africa from ancient Egypt to the present. Some of the topics studied include the kingdoms of West Africa, Ethiopia, European colonization, independence movements, apartheid South Africa, Rwandan genocide, and current political affairs taking place on the continent.

406 Comparative Politics (0.5)

This second semester course provides sophomore students with a broad understanding of the modern political scene. A selection from the following nations are studied in-depth to compare and contrast their various approaches in governing a group of people – United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, Russia, China, India, Mexico, Brazil, Nigeria, Iran and the United States.

407 Advanced Placement (AP) World History (0.1)

This is a comprehensive course equivalent to college freshmen World History. This course surveys World History from 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Considerable time will be spent developing skills of historical analysis and synthesis. Students will use primary and secondary sources to research historical questions and use their findings to support a thesis. They will learn strategies to develop better questions as well as to think like a historian. Students will also improve their ability to respond both orally and in writing to historical questions.

Non-Francophone (NF) French

501 6 - 8 French NF Beginner

This course is designed to help middle school students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the French language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where French is spoken.

502 6 - 8 French NF Intermediate

It is intended to build on the skills acquired previously including the sound-symbol system, vocabulary as well as word and sentence order appropriate to simple oral or written texts in the present, future and past tenses.

Students will be working towards understanding the meaning of a series of interrelated ideas in oral or written texts dealing with a familiar topic, primarily in structured situations and to some extent in unstructured situations and to express their communicative intent by producing, orally and in writing, a series of interrelated ideas, mostly prepared in advance but working towards being more spontaneously, based on the communicative task.

503 6 - 8 French NF Advanced

This course continues to develop the language skills in French through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities relate to the topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall, and creativity. Middle school students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the French language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the French speaking world.

504 9-12 French NF Beginner (1.0)

This course is designed to help high school students develop a basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing and prepare them for further study of the French language. The communicative approach is used to introduce vocabulary and structures through the functions of the language. Authentic materials and cultural information are interwoven throughout the course to provide a framework for proficiency in the language and an appreciation of the cultures of the countries where French is spoken.

505 9-12 French NF Intermediate (1.0)

It is intended to build on the skills acquired previously including the sound-symbol system, vocabulary as well as word and sentence order appropriate to simple oral or written texts in the present, future and past tenses.

Students will be working towards understanding the meaning of a series of interrelated ideas in oral or written texts dealing with a familiar topic, primarily in structured situations and to some extent in unstructured situations and to express their communicative intent by producing, orally and in writing, a series of interrelated ideas, mostly prepared in advance but working towards being more spontaneously, based on the communicative task.

506 9-12 French NF Advanced (1.0)

This course continues to develop the language skills in French through a communicative approach. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities relate to the topics that reflect student interests. The materials and activities emphasize authentic situations and require thinking, recall, and creativity. High school students are encouraged to express their own needs and interests in the French language. Supplementary materials relating to culture help to further develop the student’s reading and writing skills as well as a continued cultural awareness of the French speaking world.

507 Advanced Placement (AP) French Language (1.0)

This course focuses on the mastery of communicative skills. Vocabulary is expanded to enable the student to read newspaper and magazine articles, literary texts, and other non-technical writings without dependency on a dictionary. The stress will also be on developing the student’s ability to express himself/herself in French, both orally and in writing, with reasonable fluency and accuracy. Grade 11/12 students are encouraged to take the AP Exam in the spring, which may result in college credit for successful participants.

Francophone French

521 French 6

Grade 6 French Francophone aims to encourage students to understand and appreciate language, to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with diverse audiences and in a range of situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning while developing and appreciation for literature.

It is intended to build on the skills acquired in the earlier grades, including vocabulary and sentence structure enrichment. Students also learn to respect the basic rules of language in the oral discussions that take place in the classroom as well as in their writing projects.

522 French 7

This course strengthens students French and prepares them for the writing of narrative, descriptive and explanatories texts. A reading text book is given to each student and they study the texts in class with the teacher. Students develop their vocabulary and spelling by reading. In addition, the focus is puton grammar and conjugation to help students avoid grammatical mistakes when writing.

523 French 8

In “Quatrième”, a detailed study of narrative writing, including the integration of description and explanation which prepares the student to tackle argumentation, is undertaken. The students will learn how to develop information and they will master more complex forms of expression through the study and production of narrative and explanatory texts. A variety of texts will be studied and discussed to help learners understand culture. Reading for cultural development is based on the study of texts of African, French or European nature selected from the 16th, 17th, 18th, 20th and 21st centuries. The program of “Cinquième” is revisited and enriched to get a complete study of different forms of expression such as narration, description, explanation and argumentation.

524 French 9 (1.0)

This course is organized according to 3 essential orientations: comprehension and practice of the main forms of argumentation (associated with the narrative, descriptive and explanatory styles); self-expression (acquired through narrative writing or argumentation with an emphasis on involvement); consideration of others (envisaged first in its individual dimension (dialogue, debate) and then in the social and cultural dimension studying literature, especially African and European).

Indeed, students will continue to study complex narrative texts and the technique of giving one’s own opinion while developing their essay writing skills. Paragraphing, connectors (logical), and the past participle agreements will be stressed.

525 French 10 (1.0)

This course is designed to help students write different types of essay. (Argumentative essay, compare and contrast essay, personal experience essay). Speech and debate are also part of the course, practicing public speaking, listening, expressing their opinions and debating using meaningful argument. In addition, grammar is taught such as adjectival and tenses agreement in order to improve students’ writings.

526 French 11/12 (1.0)

Le programme de 11/12e francophone vise l’étude d’œuvres littéraires d’expression française, l’approfondissement de la langue, principalement en matière de lexique et de syntaxe pour s'exprimer, à l'écrit comme à l'oral, de manière claire, rigoureuse et convaincante.

L'acquisition de ces connaissances et de ces capacités va de pair avec des attitudes intellectuelles qui se caractérisent par la curiosité, l'ouverture d'esprit, l'aptitude à l'échange, l'appropriation personnelle des savoirs et la créativité.

Grade 11/12 Francophone program aims to study French literature from various origins, deepen the knowledge and mastering of the French language particularly in the lexical and syntax areas in order to express thoughts and opinions in a clear, rigorous and convincing manner both in written and orally in an environment nurturing curiosity, exchange of ideas, open-mind and creativity.

Upper School Curriculum

601 Physical Education (0.5 or 1.0)

The co-educational physical education program is designed to offer each student experiences in a variety of activities: team sports, physical fitness activities, swimming and recreational activities. Through these activities students are encouraged and assisted in learning to move more effectively and to develop skills that will lead to participation in leisure time sports activities. Physical Education is a first semester mandatory course at the grade 9 level, a full year mandatory course at the grade 10 level, but may be taken as an option semester course for grade 11 students.

602 Health (0.5)

This course is an introduction to social, mental, and physical health. The content is geared to guide freshmen students in understanding their own development as well as the development of others. Topics include mental health, relationships, human development, substance abuse, reproduction, disease prevention, nutrition and fitness, and environmental and community health. In addition to content knowledge, students will expand their ability to think analytically, set goals, understand cultural influences, and develop interpersonal communication skills. These concepts will be taught through group discussions, research based projects, journaling, and student presentations.

603 Speech and Debate (1.0)

Speech and Debate is a mandatory class for 11th graders. Juniors learn a variety of public speaking and debate styles such as informative, persuasive, impromptu, and extemporaneous speaking and Lincoln-Douglas, public forum, parliamentary and policy debates. In the first semester, students concentrate on speaking techniques and delivery, becoming comfortable speaking in public and organizational methods. The second semester begins with a unit on negotiation and then moves into debate, building on the speaking skills learned in the first semester.

604 Senior Seminar (1.0)

This course is designed to assist seniors in transitioning from high school to college. The first semester focus is compiling a portfolio, writing senior essays, gathering references, and completing college applications. During the second semester, each senior will be expected to complete a self-designed project related to a career interest that includes research, application, and presentation before an evaluation panel.

605 AP Studio Art (2-D/Drawing) (1.0)

AP Studio Art students work with diverse media, styles, subjects, and content. Students create a three-part portfolio that is submitted to the College Board for evaluation. The Breadth section illustrates a range of ideas and approaches to art making. The Concentration section demonstrates sustained, deep, and multi-perspective investigation of a student-selected topic. The Quality section represents the student’s most successful works with respect to form and content. Student work is informed and guided by observation, research, experimentation, discussion, critical analysis, and reflection. Students document their artistic ideas and practices to demonstrate conceptual and technical development over time. This course does not have a written test.

606 Digital Photography and Video (0,5)

Students are introduced to the history of photography and photographic genres. They consider the relationship between form and content. Students learn about composition and light, and practice manipulating camera settings to achieve specific results. They learn the basics of photo editing using software including Adobe Photoshop. Students engage in critiques of their own work and the work of others. They also critically analyze the use of photography as a means of communication in society. At the end of the semester, short videos are created using iMovie. Students use their own digital cameras or smart phones (equipped with the appropriate apps).

Middle School Electives

The purpose of the mandatory exploratory offerings is to provide students an opportunity to experience several complementary courses of studies in preparation for selecting those of higher aptitude and interest in high school.

701 Quest

This course is a one-semester class designed to aid elementary students transitioning to middle school. Initial emphasis is put on organizational and study skills and how to cope with the academic changes that occur when moving from fifth to sixth grades. Students also learn about, discuss and investigate personal changes and development of such topics as: personal identity, peer pressure, academic progress and success, relationships and health and body development. The ultimate goal of this course is that each student be given accurate information, tools and possibilities to learn, with which to make the best choices for his or her physical and social well-being during adolescent years.

702 Research & Information Management

This one-quarter course for grades six through nine, is designed to extend each student's capacity to develop and defend a thesis statement while actively, critically and ethically consuming and producing information. From planning strategies to guide inquiry, to managing, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information, students empower themselves with skills for lifelong learning, communication and careers. The skills developed, tasks selected and assigned, technology used and product expectations all vary depending on the developmental level of the students involved. However, all classes generally follow this path: students develop a research question to drive inquiry and research; develop further effective note-taking and summarization skills; improve their ability to evaluate the authority, reliability, and relevance of websites and other information sources; create or augment existing blogs to collect and analyze information they find; publish reflective, process-related posts; create a thesis statement to defend/prove; go through the process of drafting a carefully-crafted and evidence-supported essay.

703 Information Technology 7

Middle school IT is a cross-curricular course that is intended to deepen students’ knowledge, skills and application of current computer programs, topics and technologies while allowing the students to integrate and apply this knowledge into their core classroom activities. Through all grades the course will reinforce areas such as internet safety, keyboarding, effective research, writing and preparing research papers and projects, online documents and applications and Microsoft Office and Office type applications.

In 7thgrade the students will build upon the 6thgrade content and then delve into more online content. Students will also begin to learn the basics of video, photo and music recording technology.

704 Information Technology 8

Middle school IT is a cross-curricular course that is intended to deepen students’ knowledge, skills and application of current computer programs, topics and technologies while allowing the students to integrate and apply this knowledge into their core classroom activities. Through all grades the course will reinforce areas such as internet safety, keyboarding, effective research, writing and preparing research papers and projects, online documents and applications and Microsoft Office and Office type applications.

The 8thgrade curriculum will be completely projects based building upon their prior knowledge by creating detailed websites, videos and projects. The students will be encouraged and expected to utilize and apply these computer skills effectively for their core classes.

705 Math Logic

This course will contain open-ended questions on algebra, geometry, statistics and probability. Open-ended refers to a question that has more than one solution and more than one strategy to obtain those solutions. The students will work collaboratively. The problems are not intended to be solved quickly or without thought. However, the challenge provided by these problems should elicit classroom discussion about strategies that may not be obvious to the average student. The objective of the course is to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills

706 Art 2-Dimensional

The 2-Dimensional Art class in the Middle School is a beginning study of basic principles of two-dimensional visual organization and skills. It provides the opportunity for students to develop and foster interest in drawing, painting, and printmaking. An integral part of the course is the study of artists throughout history, as well as contemporary and African Art. Some of the areas covered in this course are: line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to two-dimensional art and design.

707 Art 3-Dimensional

The 3-Dimensional Art class in the Middle School is a beginning study of basic principles of three-dimensional visual organization and skills. It provides the opportunity for students to develop artistic skills in ceramics, jewelry making, woodworking, and functional design. An integral part of the course is the study of artists and design throughout history, as well as contemporary and African Art. Some of the areas covered in this course are: line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to three-dimensional art and design.

708 Performance 6

Upon completion of the course the student will be able to recognize and demonstrate elements of a good quality performance including emotion, motivation, focus and dynamics. Types of performance will include dance, music, movement and improvisation. The course will also include an investigation into African and Burkinabe music.

709 Performance 7

This course builds on principles learned in Performance 6 and seeks to expand the expressive abilities and repertoire of the individual student as well as the group dynamic. More emphasis is given to group choreography and how best to utilize individual strengths.

710 MS Music

The band will consist of a 20 piece drum and bugle corps. Instruments will include baritones, horns, trumpets, comets, flugelhorns, mellophones, snare drums and bass drums. Students will develop the musical skills required to perform on their instrument while performing basic marching routines. The band will perform in concert and at social and sporting events such as softball tournaments and other school sponsored activities.

High School Electives

801 Business Management (0.5)

This course provides an introduction to the various challenges and responsibilities encountered in managing a business. Students will develop business management skills through involvement in the maintenance and operation of the ISO on-site snack shop and will gain practical experience in a real work-setting. Students will rotate through a series of different jobs, including store manager, in order to learn the different aspects of how a business works and the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, and organizing comprising the manager role. Topics include Resource Management (purchasing, and tracking sales and inventory and basic accounting), Worker Management, Marketing, Planning, Customer Service Relations and Food Safety. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic operations of a business.

802 Microeconomics (0.5)

In this course, students will learn to apply an analytical approach to the study of how individuals and societies deal with the fundamental problem of scarce resources. This approach is applied to everyday decisions faced by individuals as they try to maximize their utility, to businesses that try to maximize profits and to the whole of society as it attempts to use its resources efficiently.

Topics covered in class will include: supply and demand; consumer theory; the theory of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and other market structures; factor markets; and market failure. Students will apply microeconomic tools to the analysis of such controversial issues as minimum wage laws, farm subsidies, rent controls, protectionism, pollution, welfare programs, and the tradeoff between equity and efficiency that results from various microeconomic policies. The successful completion of this course should allow students to better understand and participate in contemporary policy debates concerning the roles of the government and the market.

803 Macroeconomics (0.5)

Macroeconomics is the branch of economics that examines the economic behaviour of the entire economy. It deals with national income, national output, national employment and so on. It is concerned with the study of real life economic issues and problems. It teaches the macroeconomic issues such as unemployment, inflation, cyclical business fluctuations, economic growth, the role of money, theories of interest rates, stabilization policies, foreign exchange rates, balance of payments difficulties, and comparative economic advantages among nations.

This course provides a common sense approach to the world of macroeconomic decisions and their impact on society. It is aimed at providing the necessary background in the economic issues of establishing, running and managing a business in today’s society.

804 Creative Writing (1.0)

The Creative Writing class at ISO offers students an opportunity to study and practice the craft of using language for creative expression. The focus of study in the class will be to understand the techniques and structures of how narrative and prose is written rather just interpreting a text for meaning. Students will be challenged over the year to apply these techniques in creating a portfolio of creative work from multiple genres that include fiction, poetry, drama and filmmaking.

805 Personal Fitness (0.5)

This is a semester course which is geared towards understanding the relationship between health, nutrition and personal fitness. The students will start by learning about the relationship between their different body types and their respective metabolisms. After grasping this concept the students will learn about healthy nutrition and how diet can directly affect their metabolism. The students will then learn about different physical exercises (aerobic and anaerobic) and how paired with great nutrition, this is the key to a successful exercise program. The students will then create their own exercise and nutrition programs in which they will attempt to achieve the personal fitness goals they have set forth for themselves.

806 Physical Education (0.5 or 1.0)

The co-educational physical education program is designed to offer each student experiences in a variety of activities: team sports, physical fitness activities, swimming and recreational activities. Through these activities students are encouraged and assisted in learning to move more effectively and to develop skills that will lead to participation in leisure time sports activities.

807 Sociology (0.5)

By focusing on historical and cultural examples as well as real-life applications, the student will discover and analyze various sociological perspectives, social groupings and social inequalities worldwide. Modern social institutions and social changes are also studied with emphasis on how values of any culture affect behavior in that culture and the effects of cultural diversity on society. Various research methods will also be used to problem-solve historical and modern social dilemmas.

808 Criminology (0.5)

This semester course will be an introductory course to the fascinating world of criminology. Criminology focuses on the “why” behind the crime and how future crimes can be prevented. Students will be introduced to the definitions and types of crimes. There will be discussions and debates on current theories of crime causation including choice, trait, social structure, and social process theories. Real life case examples will be analyzed using these theories. The criminal justice system will also be examined as it relates to types of crime and prisoner rehabilitation.

809 Social Work (0.5)

Social work is aimed on assisting individuals, groups or communities enhance or restore their social functioning, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed and living in poverty. This semester course provides an introduction to the various fields in social work such as child welfare, chemical dependency and addiction, immigration and refugees, mental health and gerontological social work. The course will discuss the history and development of current social welfare practice and debate the various perspectives and methods used. This course will involve case studies and real life examples from many fields in social work. This course will also focus on having students more involved in local social work organizations committed to empowering the local community.

810 Psychology (1.0)

This class is an introduction to psychology. The curriculum will cover the following main topics: the biology of psychology (the brain, perception and sensations, emotions, stress and coping); developmental psychology (child development, personality); cognitive psychology (learning, memory, thinking and language); psychological disorders and psychotherapy; social psychology (social and cultural dimensions of behavior). Freshman students will be engaged in various activities such as group discussions, creating presentations, writing of articles.

811 Yearbook (1.0)

This class will design the school's yearbook. The curriculum will cover the basics in the following topics: principles of page design, yearbook themes, yearbook content, photography, photo editing. Students will be assigned jobs (page designer, photographer, writer) and pages to design. They will learn basic skills in Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop.

812 Graphic Design (0.5)

This class is an introduction to Graphic Design. The curriculum will cover the following main topics: basic principles of design, color theory, typography, logo design. Students will learn basic skills in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe illustrator. Students' designs will get printed on various items such as T-shirts, cups and bags and will be put for sale in the "class store".

813 Web Design (0.5)

This class is an introduction to Web Design. The curriculum will cover the basics in the following topics: internet, principles of web design, designing for business, HTML, CSS. Students will learn basic skills in Adobe Dreamweaver and Adobe Photoshop. Each student will design a website that will be uploaded on the internet.

814 High School Performance (0.5)

High school performance teaches students to be able to recognize and demonstrate elements of a good quality performance including emotion, motivation, focus and dynamics. Types of performance will include dance, music, movement and improvisation. The course will also include an investigation into local African music.

815 High School Drama (0.5)

Acting: High school students will explore the craft of acting in an approach that involves exercises, scene work and theater games designed to develop performance skills and technique.

Audition: High school students will build a basic understanding of the audition process through preparation of audition monologues and develop audition techniques.

Improv: Through theater games and energy work, high school students learn to develop creativity and self-expression.

Backstage: High school students will explore scene design, lighting, technical production, costumes and prop choices.

Direction, Production, Playwriting: High school students will explore the function of the director, producer and playwright in the creative process.

816 Guitar (0.5)

High school students will develop the skills necessary to play common chords, simple melodies and bass lines on the guitar in a setting which allows personal expression and growth. Once students have attained a novice level in their playing of the guitar they will have the freedom to explore their musical interests on a much more individual basis allowing them to pursue rock, jazz, blues or any other style of music they desire.

This semester course will include both solo and ensemble performances and have a focus on original composition.

817 Art 2-Dimensional (0.5)

The 2-Dimensional Art class in the High School is a beginning study of basic principles of two-dimensional visual organization and skills. It provides the opportunity for students to develop and foster interest in drawing, painting, and printmaking. An integral part of the course is the study of artists throughout history, as well as contemporary and African Art. Some of the areas covered in this course are: line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to two-dimensional art and design.

818 Art 3-Dimensional (0.5)

The 3-Dimensional Art class in the High School is a beginning study of basic principles of three-dimensional visual organization and skills. It provides the opportunity for students to develop artistic skills in ceramics, jewelry making, woodworking, and functional design. An integral part of the course is the study of artists and design throughout history, as well as contemporary and African Art. Some of the areas covered in this course are: line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to three-dimensional art and design.

819 Career Art (0.5)

The Career Art class is a promotional study of applying artistic interest and skill into a rewarding and profitable career. Each semester, students will be provided the opportunity to discover and experience three different art careers. The first semester includes the study of: Interior Design, Architecture and Graphic Design; the second semester includes: Fashion Design, Furniture Design, and Art Education. Each semester will include one in-depth project. Each project is based on one area of study that is designed and completed by the students either individually or as a whole.

820 HS Band (1.0)

The band will consist of a 20 piece drum and bugle corps. Instruments will include baritones, horns, trumpets, comets, flugelhorns, mellophones, snare drums and bass drums. Students will develop the musical skills required to perform on their instrument while performing basic marching routines. The band will perform in concert and at social and sporting events such as softball tournaments and other school sponsored activities.

821 Research & Information Management (0.25)

This one-quarter course for grades six through nine, is designed to extend each student's capacity to develop and defend a thesis statement while actively, critically and ethically consuming and producing information. From planning strategies to guide inquiry, to managing, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information, students empower themselves with skills for lifelong learning, communication and careers. The skills developed, tasks selected and assigned, technology used and product expectations all vary depending on the developmental level of the students involved. However, all classes generally follow this path: students develop a research question to drive inquiry and research; develop further effective note-taking and summarization skills; improve their ability to evaluate the authority, reliability, and relevance of websites and other information sources; create or augment existing blogs to collect and analyze information they find; publish reflective, process-related posts; create a thesis statement to defend/prove; go through the process of drafting a carefully-crafted and evidence-supported essay using the MLA citation style.

Special Academic Programs

901 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 6-8 Beginner

This course is for students who come to ISO with little or no knowledge of basic English. Students first learn to express their basic school needs in English. From that point on, the main goal of ESOL is to improve language proficiency in academic situations, or those aspects of language proficiency that emerge and become distinctive with formal schooling. Students use the English language to reason and analyze, to comprehend oral and written text and to learn new vocabulary and concepts. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes.

902 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 6-8 Intermediate/Advanced

This course is for students whose native language is other than English, who have already acquired basic English skills but still need to improve their proficiency in English. This course is expanding the topics of the beginner ESOL course on a higher level and will help students to improve their listening, speaking, pronunciation and writing skills and to learn correct English grammar. It will also help students to improve their vocabulary knowledge and literacy skills. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes.

The English language level of every nonnative speaker will be evaluated by a norm referenced test at the end of each semester. The result of this test will determine if the student needs to continue the ESOL class or not.

902 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 9-10 Intermediate/Advanced

This course is for students whose native language is other than English, who have already acquired basic English skills but still need to improve their proficiency in English. This course is expanding the topics of the beginner ESOL course on a higher level and will help students to improve their listening, speaking, pronunciation and writing skills and to learn correct English grammar. It will also help students to improve their vocabulary knowledge and literacy skills. The goal is to enable students to participate successfully in their content area classes.

The English language level of every nonnative speaker will be evaluated by a norm referenced test at the end of each semester. The result of this test will determine if the student needs to continue the ESOL class or not.

01 BP 1142, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Tel: 226-25-36-21-43
Tel: 226-25-36-13-50

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